Archive for the ‘the hayward fault’ Category

The crack by the temple

26 December 2013

The Oakland Urban Paths walk last month took us along a stretch of the Hayward fault that included the Oakland LDS temple. Here’s that segment of the fault on the map.

LDSfaultmap

The temple is just below the dashed line across the map (which marks the 26th kilometer from Point Pinole). The codes refer to geomorphic (G) evidence of the fault, G1 being “strongly pronounced”: a linear valley (lv) and a notch (n). Less obvious are linear scarps (G2, sl) and a scissor point (G3, sc). The circle labeled C2 marks a measured feature that documents creep, a surveyed offset (so) documented in report number L91, which was a 1991 article in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Knowing all that, I had my eyes peeled as we went through the temple grounds. This is right by the front gate between the grounds and Maiden Lane.

faultLDS

I can’t pronounce this a fault trace, but it’s consistent with one.

The Kitchener scarp

30 November 2013

The recent walk by the Oakland Urban Paths group took us past a catastrophe I hadn’t seen before: the landslide of 15 January 1970. It removed nearly all the homes on the east side of Kitchener Court, just south of the LDS Temple, and dumped the ground into the valley of upper Peralta Creek. The land is still empty and uninhabitable. Here’s a look south over the scarp from Kitchener.

kitchenerscarp

The slide wiped out the middle of London Road between a tiny stub at the top of Maple Street and the forlorn end trailing off of Maiden Lane. The Hayward fault is mapped right through the foot of the slide. The site of my photo is across the pink strip opposite the “J” on this portion of the Oakland geologic map.

kitchenergeomap

I frankly can’t vouch for any of the bedrock divisions shown here, but the dashed line of the fault is close enough to reality. For orientation, here’s the equivalent area in Google Maps. Rettig canyon, where Peralta Creek cuts through the bedrock ridge of Leona keratophyre (pink) and mixed Franciscan rocks (KJf), is in the patch of green at lower center.

kitchenergoogmap

39th Avenue fault gauge revisited

27 November 2013

2-1/2 years ago, I presented a photo of a cut mark in the curb of 39th Avenue where the Hayward fault is mapped. This month I happened to visit the spot during an Oakland Urban Pathways walk, and I took the opportunity to take a new photo.

39th-faultgauge-2013

It has moved slightly, just a few millimeters, in the intervening time.

The U.S. Geological Survey monitors the fault closely through Oakland. They don’t measure this mark, or if they do it’s not definitive. The definitive survey is along a longer line across the fault, because the fault movement isn’t limited to a perfectly thin geometric plane. Their measurements show that this part of Oakland is creeping approximately 4 millimeters per year. Heck, here’s a good source, from a 2000 paper by the USGS guys that was published in Geophysical Research Letters:

HFcreeptable

The authors note that Oakland has a relatively slow rate of creep, and they interpret that as a sign that the fault here is more extensively locked than it is elsewhere. The area and degree of locking bears directly on the energy the fault is capable of releasing. Mind you, we have over a decade of new data and new thinking since that paper was published, but the data is sound.


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