Archive for the ‘sausal creek watershed’ Category

Fruit Vale

27 June 2013

The valley of Sausal Creek below Dimond Canyon made a natural site for orchards: a nice flat floodplain with decent soil and a permanent stream off on the western side. Also, the valley is straight to a degree that strikes me as unusual, which is handy for laying out blocks of land. It may or may not have been filled with oaks—I have a copy of an old print titled “Oaks of Oakland” that purports to be from this area. In any case it has a classic shape with a flat floor and steep sides formed by the Oakland alluvial fan (the Fan). I’ve shown the high, landslide-prone western side before; here’s the eastern side. This is the view from the Fruitvale freeway exit looking up Harold Street, where the valley wall is pretty dramatic.


Farther down, the valley wall fades away well before you get to Foothill Boulevard, which everywhere marks the edge of the Fan. Here at Fruitvale Boulevard and Bona Street, the valley wall is already lower and more subdued.


It looks like I’ll name this lobe of the Fan the Patten lobe. The valley of Peralta Creek is just over the hill. It’s interesting to speculate why the Peraltas put their rancho buildings there rather than here.

Sneak creek peek

22 February 2013

Sausal Creek has escaped culverting in a large part of its course. Between Dimond Park and the freeway, it mostly runs through people’s back yards, but you can spot it looking downstream from MacArthur Boulevard across from Canon Avenue:


. . . and farther down, looking upstream from a spot at the intersection of Dimond Avenue and Montana Street.


It’s culverted from here all the way down to the end of Hickory Street, directly below the miserable house on McKillop Street. Maybe it’s safer to say that the creek is covered, because even this open stretch has walls hemming it in.

Dimond valley

6 February 2013

Sausal Creek is responsible for digging a floodplain that is rather wide just upstream from I-580. Here’s the view across it from Montana Street at MacArthur.


The squat tower just to the left of the speed limit sign is at the foot of Lincoln Avenue, and it’s at the same elevation as where I’m standing. That’s how wide the valley is. Here’s another view looking right down MacArthur.


The first cross street is Canon Avenue, the next one is Dimond Avenue leading up to the park, and beyond is the Fruitvale Avenue crossing. Here’s how the geology is mapped.


You can see that the stream valley is wide because three streams coalesce here at the edge of the Piedmont bedrock block. Restricted upstream, they enter the big alluvial fan (Qpaf) and have room to move and easy material to erode. It is curious that Sausal Creek hugs the west side of the valley; I suspect that tectonic movements may account for that, but only a decade or so of careful satellite altitude monitoring can answer my suspicion.


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