Archive for the ‘Oakland streams and water’ Category

Brooklyn Landing, Brooklyn Creek

19 June 2017

The first Western inhabitants of this area, the Peralta family, were horse people rather than boat people. They did much of their business, with the mission and the town of San Jose in the South Bay, by land. When they did use boats, it was to transport hides and tallow from their ranch, using an embarcadero on San Antonio Creek to the east of the slough that’s now called Lake Merritt. Unlike the slough, the creek was navigable there, being several feet deep even at low tide. Although there was a better spot on the west side of the slough, the rancheros would have had to haul their wagons through the hills around the slough to reach it. They preferred the simple downhill route from their hacienda. (The Americans, with the larger vision of newcomers, took that other spot and made it the mighty harbor we know today.)

Later the town of Brooklyn formed around the Peraltas’ landing. The map below, from 1857, shows San Antonio Creek winding its way west from the Brooklyn landing (thanks Wikipedia).

Incidentally this was a true creek, according to long-standing usage in Britain and colonial America — “a small, narrow tidal inlet or estuary” as the AGU Glossary of Geology puts it. Today we use “creek” for any small stream . . . like 14th Avenue Creek (as the watershed people call it), which flowed down to the landing. If this creek had another name, maps don’t record it, and anyway I feel like calling it Brooklyn Creek. The first road, named Commerce Street, ran up along that creek. Today you can drive up it under its new name of 14th Avenue (or ride the odd little 96 line) and still see the valley walls on either side.

Long story short, the land was built out and the little harbor disappeared as first the railroads, then the freeway and then BART ran through. The geologic map shows all that as artificial fill (af).

This was once the omphalos of East Oakland. Two different horse-drawn railroads had terminals here, the Oakland, Brooklyn and Fruitvale Railroad and the Brooklyn and Fruitvale Railroad. Today little remains to mark this former place. It was still a destination when the San Francisco and Oakland Railroad sited a heavy-rail station here in 1864, and a single palm tree from the old days grows yet amid today’s anonymous tracks. And there’s tiny, seedy Vantage Point Park on the low rise that once overlooked our first harbor.

Brooklyn Creek is fully culverted now. Its outlet is probably across the transport corridor at this little cutout along the shoreline.

Today San Antonio Creek is no longer even an entity. The waterway has been replaced entirely by Oakland’s dredged-out Inner Harbor and Brooklyn Basin.

Stonehurst Creek

8 May 2017

Stonehurst Creek isn’t really a creek, just a stormwater channel. But there it is on the watershed map, with a name and everything. Of the 13 named tributaries that feed San Leandro Creek, it’s the last one before the Bay. And it’s got potential.

I only discovered Stonehurst Creek because one day last June I set out to follow the Union Pacific track under the 880 freeway. (And pioneer a scenic route to the Cleophus Quealy tasting room.)

The tracks parallel 105th Avenue, and of course it’s private property. I advise you not to go there. If you choose to ignore my advice, however, the easiest access in Oakland is from Knight Street. You walk to the left of the tracks, near the drainage ditch that is Stonehurst Creek.

A maintenance road runs along the far side. This photo, from June 2016 at the height of the drought, shows there’s always water here.

This spring the area’s pretty lush in comparison. And if you look back, it’s not devoid of scenery.

On the other side of the freeway, the tracks cross San Leandro Creek. From there you can spot the mouth of Stonehurst Creek, looking almost creeklike.

I’m telling you all this because the route could become more of a destination under the newly released San Leandro Creek Trail Master Plan Study, a long-term vision of how we can get people back to Oakland’s largest and most important stream.

Because San Leandro Creek is very hard to access upstream from here, there would need to be a detour, and Stonehurst Creek would be handy for that. The Study mentions the “potential restoration of Stonehurst Creek,” which sounds funny because old maps don’t show any creek at all here to “restore.” Apparently the technical meaning of restoration includes building a natural creek from scratch.

You can continue down the tracks past Davis Street and turn right to get to Doolittle Drive, then go north to make your way to Cleophus Quealy — I mean, *I* can. The point is to arrive thirsty. But while we’re on the bridge, let’s look at San Leandro Creek.

Downstream, there’s a maintenance road on the left bank that could be opened up nicely to foot and bike traffic, and on the right bank a tidy, bare open space at the end of Empire Road that could become more of a park.

Upstream is more forbidding: there’s a maintenance road there too, but it’s down in the streambed, below the right bank, and couldn’t easily be opened to the public. Hence the need for a detour up Stonehurst Creek. Conceivably you could walk it in the dry season, but I would advise against that.

The San Leandro Creek Trail Master Plan Study says, “There is a large open space below I-880 that could be used creatively.”

And there are some visionaries hard at work doing that already.

Perhaps you would find their efforts as arresting as I do. Perhaps you would be dumbstruck, as I was. Perhaps you would exclaim, as people who explore Oakland often do, “There’s a there here!”

No matter where you go in Oakland, this town can excite some form of wordless delight.

Oakland geology ramble 3: Knowland to Dunsmuir Ridge

7 November 2016

This ramble is special for its surprising woodsiness and remoteness. I’ve seen enough deer bones along the way to guess that if any mountain lions live on this side of the hills, this is where they are.

The route is a bit less than 4 miles long and has 500 feet of elevation gain in the middle. You go up the valley of Arroyo Viejo starting at the Oakland Zoo entrance, over the drainage divide in Knowland Park, then down through the twin canyons of Upper Elmhurst Creek, a tributary of San Leandro Creek. So, there’s a lot of woods:

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A lot of hills:

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And a lot of rocks:

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This post has been a long time in the making because I wanted to try all the options. The photos are from this summer, when I explored it in earnest.

Take the 46 or 46L bus line to the zoo entrance. From there, walk in through the gate and turn left. There’s an unsung trail, dotted with seating and signage, that shows off the creek here.

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The trail crosses the creek and connects with a fire road. Soon after that, the stream valley splits and you have two routes — the northern one is the fire road, and the other is a tiny trail along the spine of the odd, narrow ridge that runs for about half a mile between the two creeks. I prefer the northern route for its rock exposures and the southern route for its seclusion and its views, like this one of the new zoo facility under construction.

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The two routes rejoin where Golf Links Road and Elysian Fields Drive meet. If you like, rummage in the creek bed and examine the fresh-scrubbed rocks of the Knoxville Formation.

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Walk carefully up Golf Links and take the fire road into Knowland Park. This part is steep, but the views open up nicely.

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And the rocks suddenly change to Franciscan melange. Knowland Park’s rocks are a destination in themselves, as I’ve pointed out here a few times.

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At the top of the park’s broad, flat crest you have three route choices. The western route slots through Snowdown Avenue, the central route through Cameron Avenue, and the eastern route through Lochard Street. I’ll show them in that order. Please note that off of paved streets, the routes are just rough lines, not precise plots.

For the western route, take Malcolm Avenue and then Montwood Way down into the headwaters of the north branch of Upper Elmhurst Creek. The fire road at the end of Montwood takes you into real wildlands.

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Bear left and head down into the valley. A fresh landslide blocks the fire road and exposes the Leona rhyolite.

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Although I call these fire roads, I think they’re really sewer roads because they all seem to serve sewer lines for the Chabot Park Highlands neighborhood.

After you cross the creek and head downsteam, the route gradually climbs out of the stream valley and takes a sharp left at the fence at the top of the Dunsmuir House property. Here it intersects with the middle route.

The middle route is picturesque because it follows Kerrigan Drive along the ridge between the two branches of Upper Elmhurst Creek. The ridge ends in a knob that widely visible, as seen here from Lochard Street.

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At the end of Kerrigan is a fire road leading to the right that goes down to the edge of the Dunsmuir House land and meets the western route.

The combined route runs level across a well-formed faceted spur, which reflects the action of the Hayward fault just a hundred meters or so to the west. Then it turns up the valley of the south branch of Upper Elmhurst Creek.

This branch should be considered the main stream of the creek, as it runs at a little lower elevation than the north branch. I suspect that the two branches may have drained in separate directions at times in the past. It would be too easy for a landslide along the fault to divert the northern stream to the right — or to the left as it runs today, for that matter. This is dynamic terrain.

Both streams are distinctly incised into their beds by up to several meters.

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This catches my attention because the hillsides are very steep, steep enough that a strong earthquake would send landslides down and clog long stretches of these streams. The last one of those was in 1868. This is an observation that applies generally to streams in the Oakland hills.

The route eventually crosses this creek and turns back west. As it climbs away from the creek it becomes a steep and narrow footpath. In due course you join the eastern route in Dunsmuir Ridge Open Space. I would tell bicyclists not to bother with this particular creek and try the eastern route instead.

The eastern route goes down Lochard Street almost to its end, where a fire road cuts off to the left. This is a very pleasant stroll through our oak-laurel forest that includes more exposures of Leona rhyolite.

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The road leaves the woods in Dunsmuir Ridge Open Space, where the view south overlooking Sheffield Village is completely different from the view west in Knowland Park.

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From here you head downhill to civilization, taking either the fire road or the footpath through the woods. They rejoin where the combined west and central route arrives, right at the trace of the Hayward fault.

To meet your public-transit needs, the 75 bus comes through Marlow Drive every hour. If you miss it, and you usually will, it’s a level walk of 2 miles to the San Leandro BART station or a shorter one to Foothill Square.