Archive for the ‘oakland stone’ Category

Some East Oakland stones

31 January 2015

Oakland’s rocks aren’t all in the ground. They’re in our yards and homes, too. Here are a few presented in the order I found them lately.

There’s a house on 60th Avenue that stopped me in my tracks, its walls studded with stones. A neighbor down the block told me “Oh yes, those are wonderful! We looked at that house when we were buying in this neighborhood. The owner’s daughter runs a preschool across the way.” Click that one for an 1100-pixel version.

morse-at-60th-450

A few weeks later I visited Best Avenue, high in Maxwell Park, and was arrested by the front yard here. Sometimes rocks, like people, look best with painted faces.

bestrox2

A block away is another property treated by the same decorator.

bestrox1

And just yesterday this basket of painted stones seized me by the eyes. It’s at the Free Oakland UP gallery and workshop, in the Loard’s plaza at Coolidge and MacArthur.

oakland-up-rox

Our local fill

23 December 2014

There’s a little corner of Lake Merritt that the improvers haven’t gotten around to, on the north shore by the pergola. Here the concrete walkway gives way to a stretch of old fill.

lakemerrittchert

The original wetland that became Lake Merritt was known as San Antonio Slough. From Oakland’s earliest days, the locals kept trying to “reclaim” it by turning it into dry land, just as they did all around the bay. The whole waterfront is reclaimed land. The basic technique was to haul dirt and rock and rubbish down to the water, shove it in and tamp it down. In Gold Rush San Francisco they’d use abandoned ships for fill, but Oakland’s founding fathers had advanced beyond such crude strategems.

Some of this material came from the holes dug for building foundations, but it also came from quarries in the local hills ranging in size from little borrow pits to big enterprises like the Blair Quarry (now Dracena Park) in Piedmont. Not just stone, either—Oakland had abundant gravel nearby, too.

If they weren’t trying to fill it in, the makers of Lake Merritt were trying to elevate its mucky shoreline and civilize it. The rocks in this part of Lake Merritt appear to be good old Franciscan chert, possibly from the “phthanite” diggings that Walter Blair exploited in today’s Moraga Canyon. It made quality fill, hard and clean and compact. I don’t know how long it will stay visible as we continue to civilize the lakeshore. Visit it some time when you’re on a walk around the lake and the ground is washed clean. The more we kick it and scuff it and curse it for stubbing our toes, the more its polish gleams.


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