Archive for the ‘Oakland geology views’ Category

Mountain View Cemetery: The Bay area’s best landscape

1 May 2017

Although I’m tempted just to let the photos in this post stand on their own, let me make a case that Mountain View Cemetery offers the best landscape in the Bay area.

First there’s the cemetery itself. The managers have been putting a lot of effort into improving the ground — see the excellent new stonework and gravel path in the first photo — and this winter’s abundant rainfall has abetted it by giving the hills a coat of green that ought to last longer than usual before turning gold, then brown.

Unlike your typical cemetery, Mountain View is very large and occupies the rolling terrain of the Piedmont block, consisting of Franciscan melange. In the photo below, all of the land in sight lies within the cemetery’s property.

Long ago the operators arranged for Cemetery Creek (headwaters of Glen Echo Creek) to fill three ponds, where the water can be parceled out over the dry season to help keep the turf lush. Right now they’re brim full and support a few waterfowl. The open hilltop on the left side will be turned into a new section of graves under a proposed plan.

The Franciscan outcrops or “knockers” in the cemetery’s hills echo the finished stone displayed so touchingly in the grave markers. Many historical Oaklanders famous and obscure rest here. A random walk in any direction will bring up names that ring a bell if you’ve spent significant time in the East Bay. Yes, that’s what cemeteries are for, but without the graves this territory would be just another busy park. The dead ensure that the living visitors stay on their best behavior.

And this is important — the delights of the cemetery don’t stop at its edge. The east side has had its huge hedge of overgrown eucalyptus removed, opening the crest of the high hills and the well-tended neighborhoods of Broadway Terrace to view.

A few eucalyptus trees remain on the hilltop hosting the cemetery’s high staging area. In manageable numbers, their trunks are attractive as they frame views of tempting places.

With the view east restored, there’s now a postcard vista in every direction you look. To the west you can see the Golden Gate, San Francisco, St. Mary’s Cemetery and Oakland’s outer harbor.

To the southwest is downtown Oakland and the ridges of the San Mateo Peninsula. These views, as well as those to the north and south, will always be unspoiled. From Mountain View, one can take in surroundings that encompass a large share of the greater Bay area from the midst of a setting that’s both attractive and historic.

So that’s my main case for this being the Bay area’s best landscape. But there’s more — there are rocks. I always make sure to visit this outcrop of red-brown radiolarian chert on the hillside behind the garden mausoleum, plot 3.

Other parts of the cemetery consist of shale, like this bit left behind from an excavation in plot 9.

The road up to the top of the cemetery exposes some of the well-bedded mudstone that underlies much of the grounds, but look in the gutter for the freshest exposure.

And once up there, make your way bayward from the northern tip of plot 77 to this outcrop of green and red chert.

I’m glad to entertain arguments that one place or another might be superior to our cemetery. For sheer viewshed, Mount Diablo is a candidate, as is Tamalpais. Twin Peaks in San Francisco gives excellent views of Oakland. Mount Livermore, on Angel Island, is worth a special mention. The South Bay and North Bay have many more picturesque places, not to mention the Peninsula. Lots of these spots survey a more spacious territory, but Mountain View surveys the most gracious territory, a viewshed of singular integrity that extends from infinity to your feet. In a region full of landscapes, this one offers as much elegance as it does grandeur.

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The marine terrace of Clinton, lengthwise

20 March 2017

A few years back I showed you a view across the flat marine terrace where the old town of Clinton once sat, back in the 1850s. To really get a sense of it, walk the length of the terrace some time. Here it is on the geologic map, marked “Qmt.”

The photos below (1000 pixels) were taken last week at the locations of the two blue asterisks.

First we have a view off the edge of the terrace at E. 15th Street and 22nd Avenue. At barely 40 feet elevation, the view is quite extensive. That’s the former Catucci building in the left middle.

East 15th Street, a residential street running between International (E. 14th) and Foothill (E. 16th) Boulevards, is a pleasant walk on this extremely level geomorphic feature. Look northeast as you go and note the abruptness of the terrace’s inner edge. That was where the sea used to lap up against the Fan during the last major interglacial, about 125,000 years ago.

At the other end of the terrace, at 3rd Street and Foothill, the land turns down toward Lake Merritt (and the hospitable Portal).

But turn around to see just how flat this thing is.

The two stream valleys that interrupt it, at 14th and 23rd Avenues, are like canyons by comparison.

Siesta Valley and the De Laveaga Trail

2 January 2017

Last week I attempted the Rockridge-to-Orinda ramble by a northern route. Was strenuous, but it got me into Siesta Valley, a place I’ve had my eye on for years, for the first time. At this time of year the sun is so low that the light is terrific.

First came the climb up Tunnel and Caldecott Roads, then through Hiller Highlands up to Grizzly Peak Boulevard, a good 1200 feet higher, then down across the Fish Ranch/Claremont saddle, where it looked like this.

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That’s Gudde Ridge, in Sibley Volcanic Preserve, with Round Top on the horizon. The stairsteps in the rock are the huge roadcut for Route 24. Siesta Valley is to my left, over the ridge.

Siesta Valley is watershed land under the control of East Bay MUD, so I made sure to have my hiking permit with me. Not a soul was around, but it’s a good habit. The De Laveaga Trail runs from the top of the valley, at the Scotts Peak Trailhead, along the valley’s north flank. (It’s named for one of Orinda’s founding families — see the comments.) I took the wrong way, going straight down the valley floor on the dirt extension of Wilder Road, which leads to the back side of the Cal Shakespeare center. That meant a steep descent and subsequent climb of a few hundred feet on a pretty wet road, but I saw some bedrock of the Siesta Formation I’d otherwise have missed.

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That included this fine chunk of freshwater limestone, all of which fizzed nicely in acid, just like it should.

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Once I gained the De Laveaga Trail, the views opened up. The basalt flows of the Moraga Formation crop out well here.

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This view looks down the Siesta Valley to its continuation as Wilder Valley, across the freeway in Orinda.

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Siesta Valley is very quiet. City noise and freeway noise are kept out by the contours of the land, and on a lazy weekday afternoon I could see myself having a nice nap.

The trail leads up and over the east wall of the valley at about 1500 feet elevation, then it’s a steep 1000-foot plunge down to Orinda. This is the view north. The cattle pond is there because cattle graze these slopes.

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The sun sets so early here that it gets cold at night. Shaded puddles stayed ice-covered all that day.

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The winter haze obscured the Sierra, but not Mount Diablo and the Lamorinda hills.

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As I raced the sunset, downtown Orinda looked inviting. This is a harsh downhill, though. Uphill would be worse, I think. Nothing to do but try it sometime.

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The verdict: Siesta Valley is a challenge to reach on foot, but that’s your only choice as vehicles of all kinds are forbidden on EBMUD land. It’s an obscure piece of land that requires a permit, but it’s a gorgeous place. With rocks!

2016: Pictures from a good year

26 December 2016

Here are some nice views I enjoyed during the year. These shots are meant for clicking through to see at full size.

In January, I said goodbye to the old Bay Bridge and looked forward to the day when the new bridge offers a superb platform for viewing the Oakland skyline.

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In February, I was captivated by the chaparral high on the face of the Leona Hills.

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In March, I got a good look at Mount Diablo from Wilton Drive, on the edge of Redwood Regional Park.

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In April I was transfixed by the view south from Fairmont Ridge to the hills back of Hayward, an area I have yet to visit.

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I took great pleasure in tramping out my first three “geology rambles” this year. Not every photo was geologically relevant, but this moment from the July day when I first envisioned ramble 3 was too charming to forget.

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And several times this year, I’ve gone to Devil’s Slide to dispose of rocks by throwing them into the boiling sea. But the views in the other direction are stupendous.

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I have enjoyed the hell out of geologizing this year.