Archive for the ‘oakland geology views’ Category

Lobe 8 of the Fan: Evergreen Cemetery hill

15 June 2015

Cemeteries occupy some of Oakland’s nicest hillsides. Evergreen Cemetery, unlike the others, has a whole hill to itself. The hill consists entirely of sand, silt and gravel laid down in a large alluvial fan (the Fan) back some time in the Pleistocene. Later, stream erosion cut the Fan into pieces, which I have numbered west to east from 1 to 8. This one’s the smallest and, all things considered, the sweetest.

lobe8-evergreencem

This is the view from 64th Avenue, the hill’s gently sloping side. The NL bus runs past here, too.

Below is the terrain view in google Maps, where I’ve marked it along with lobes 6 and 7.

lobe8-topo

This is the view from across MacArthur Boulevard at 68th Avenue/Church Street. The hill is pretty secluded, with trees screening it on most sides. When you’re there, your eyes are lifted to distant views, which is fitting. The homes on the far side of 68th probably excavated into the edge of the hill when they were built.

lobe8-from-church

When the weather’s right, you can get a good view of it from Outlook hill, for instance from Delmont Avenue:

lobe8-millsmont

or from the overlook at the end of Simson Street. These days the cemetery is doing its part in the drought. Most homeowners are, too.

lobe3-from-simson

The geologic map (as seen in this earlier post) shows a little more Fan alluvium to the north and east of the hill, but it’s topographically subdued.

Landslides of Outlook hill

5 March 2015

I’ve been surveying the low hill between Mills College and Holy Redeemer College, home of the Millsmont and Eastmont Hills neighborhoods. Its western face has no bedrock, either on the geologic map or in my experience. Here’s the relevant portion of the geologic map.

outlookmap

Its crest is supposedly Jurassic basalt, which would be part of the Franciscan assemblage. But the Hayward fault runs right along its length, and I lean toward calling it a pressure ridge. Long story short, it is squeezed up, shattered, and oversteepened, and these make it prone to landslides. Here are some, starting with the notable example at the top of 64th Avenue. This is its toe . . .

64th-beunaventura-slide

. . . and this is the view from its head, at Delmont Avenue.

64-buena-slide-top

Another is above Outlook Avenue, south of 76th Avenue. As you walk along its base, you’ll see bits of concrete from the homes that once stood here.

outlook-76-slide

Above it, on Hillmont Drive, there is a gap in the houses that offers a nice view. I have no business saying whether a landslide is responsible.

outlook-76-slide-top

Between these two obvious slides are some fine hillsides. This one, below Simson Street, makes a lovely backdrop to the Eastmont mall and, it seems, a nice informal park for the residents.

simson-field

It isn’t really vacant—all of the lots that subdivide it are extremely long for some reason. I think that spaces like this, shared without fuss by the landowners around it, are very precious.


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