Oakland geology ramble 1, Leimert to Redwood

For a while now I’ve been envisioning geological rambles around Oakland — walks (hikes, really) that aren’t loops, but traverses. They rely on public transit, because that’s mainly how I roll. You can walk them in either direction. My ultimate idea is to work out a network of rambles that will cover the whole town. You could combine them into epic outings. This is the first ramble. It’s a little more than 4 miles.

The west end of the route is on Park Boulevard at the Leimert Bridge. The 18 bus line will get you there from either the MacArthur or the downtown BART station. Starting elevation is ~375 feet. Here’s the street route (1000 pixels):

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And here’s the corresponding geologic map:

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Briefly, the route takes you past Franciscan sandstone of the Piedmont block (Kfn), then crosses the Hayward fault into much older mixed rocks of the Coast Range ophiolite (basalt (Jb), serpentinite (sp), Leona “rhyolite” volcaniclastics (Jsv)) and a bit of Late Jurassic mudstone of the Knoxville Formation (KJk). (Search this site for more about all those rocks.) Remember to leave the stone alone.

Oakmore Hill looks pretty intimidating as you cross the Leimert Bridge. Part of that is because of Dimond Canyon below. The bridge is about 125 feet above Sausal Creek.

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Buy your fuel and water in the charming little Oakmore commercial district. Then make your way to Braemar Street along the top of the hill. Take any route you like. The intersection of Arcadia and Melvin, directly above the E in “Oakmore,” is a good shady spot to regroup and refresh.

Along the way you’ll see exposures of the sandstone.

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Braemar Street is nice and level. Truck along right to the end and enter the footpath like you do it all the time. As you descend the steps, look across the fault-line valley to the bare slopes of Joaquin Miller Park. That’s where you’re headed.

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Closer to hand, you’ll see that the rock has changed. This appears to be the Jurassic basalt, unit Jb.

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On the way to the freeway overcrossing at Lincoln Avenue, look at the lay of the land.

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The active trace of the Hayward fault isn’t precisely mapped here, but it runs from about the lower middle edge on the left side to the horizon directly behind the large tree (note the LDS Temple spire on the right edge). The next time the ground breaks, you’ll see it very clearly here.

Cross the freeway and take Woodminster Lane to Woodside Glen Court, where the road ends at a backdoor entrance to Joaquin Miller Park at about 700 feet elevation. Things get pretty steep here, and they’ll stay steep.

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The exposure appears to be either Leona rhyolite or Franciscan sandstone; the important thing is that the bedrock changes abruptly as you enter the woods into the area mapped as serpentinite.

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Specifically, this is blueschist, the electrifying high-grade metamorphic rock that’s intimately mixed with greenish serpentine rock throughout this map unit. Enjoy the trail, which is the little-traveled west end of the Sinawik Trail, as you puff your way up to about 950 feet at Lookout Point. Stop a bit and check out the high-grade boulders there. (You’ll want to stop anyway.)

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This is where I show the route forking. It’s easier to go right, either on the trail or on Sanborn Road, going downhill to Joaquin Miller Road and across it to Butters Drive. I took the high route, up what I call Visionary Ridge, because I was returning two pieces of basalt to the locality where I got them. I thought better of that plan as I passed the park’s native plant nursery, where I added them to the little border at the bottom of this photo.

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The hillsides here are pure serpentinite and worth a close look. The high route continues along the ridge crest, around 1100 feet, to Joaquin Miller Road, where you cross and take Robinson Drive to where it meets Butters Drive at about 1025 feet. The high route will save you a loss and gain of 200 feet, but you’ll miss Butters Drive.

Butters Drive starts in some of Oakland’s most spectacular serpentine/blueschist ground, and it’s landscaped too. (See more photos from a 2015 visit here.)

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Continue past the hairpin turn into the headwaters of Peralta Creek in the Butters Canyon private preserve. Here the rock along the road is mapped as Leona rhyolite.

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The intriguing thing is that right across the creek the rock is Knoxville Formation, a unit that’s generally shale and hence easily eroded. I think this contact is exploited by the creek to dig the canyon so locally deep. You can get a good look at the Knoxville right above the intersection with Robinson Drive, where the high and low routes meet again.

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Now the route plunges about 300 feet down Crestmont Drive and through Oakland’s largest area of serpentinite. Take in the prodigious exposure at Crestmont and Kimberlin Heights drives.

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The west edge of the serpentinite zone is a thrust fault, which means the rock here is quite pulverized. This part of the hike has several interesting exposures that I’ll let you discover on your own. The very easternmost end of Crestmont Drive goes through Leona rhyolite, which you’ll see in boulders.

When you reach Redwood Road, truck on downhill to Campus Drive at about 650 feet elevation, where the 54 bus comes by regularly. It’ll take you to the Fruitvale BART station or connect you to major lines on MacArthur, Foothill or International boulevards.

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2 Responses to “Oakland geology ramble 1, Leimert to Redwood”

  1. nbschiff Says:

    This is great! I will use this suggestion for a walk!

  2. Mike Says:

    In the late ’60s, I used to collect pyrite crystals (dodecahedral habit, usually no larger than 2 or 3 cm in diameter) in an intensely altered outcrop of the Leona Rhyolite at a locality known as “Leona Heights” (now Leona Heights Park). I think the bedrock there is the same as the outcrop of Leona rocks mentioned in this ramble blog post. The Heights was an old quarry site mined for the massive pyrite (FesSO4), which was a source of sulfur used as a key component of industrial-grade paints and doping compounds. Here’s a couple of websites about The Heights: http://e2cr.net/leona-heights/ -and- https://localwiki.org/oakland/Leona_Heights_Sulfur_Mine. Leona Park (which includes the old mine site) is accessible via Mountain Boulevard, a short distance and southwest of your ramble (see map web page: https://localwiki.org/oakland/map/Leona_Heights_Sulfur_Mine). Collecting in the park is probably not permitted, but I bet there’s still pyrite weathering out of the slope. As an aside, the “trail” near the outcrop I collected at was originally a “cut” that accommodated the roadbed of the old Key System Short Line railway that operated in the east Bay briefly in the late ’20s/early ’30s.

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