Chimes Creek headwaters

I’ve mentioned how tempting the uppermost catchment of Chimes Creek looks, perched above the Leona Quarry scar:

chimesCktop

Finally got up there last week. Access is difficult and not for casual visits.

Here’s the valley in Google Earth, looking obliquely at it. At first glance it looks natural, but it’s heavily engineered.

Chimeshead-view

I’ll show photos going from top to bottom, between the two dots on the above image. The valley above the upper dot was filled in by the Ridgemont developers, using material cut from the ridge to its left. This is the view downhill from the position of the upper dot.

Chimeshead-1

The floor of the valley here is crisscrossed with concrete ditches, which converge about a third of the way down the transect at a culvert. Along the way you pass a large outcrop. All the rock here consists of the Leona “rhyolite.” The outcrops are tempting, but the slope is steep and treacherous.

Chimeshead-2

Here’s the culvert, possibly the only one in Oakland without graffiti, joined from the right side by the concrete ditch. I think it must carry runoff from the Ridgemont streets. But what’s that ugly orange?

Chimeshead-outlet

Why, it’s acid drainage from one particular part of the subsurface here. I would love to see the geotechnical reports from the time they built this development.

Chimeshead-pipes

This is one of many places where I’ve seen “yellowboy” in the Leona; the most notorious is the old sulfur mine, of course, and I noted another last week. By now I think that every excavation in this rock unit, old or new, should be treated as a potential hazard.

The next couple hundred feet downhill from here is a lovely tree-shaded, undisturbed steep cascade over large boulders. Here are just two of them.

Chimeshead-3

This beautiful rock is extensively slickensided (polished by underground movements) and coated with the iron hydroxide minerals that result from natural weathering. It is not stained orange by the pollution from upstream; in fact the water at this point is only slightly milky. It’s very much like the rocks in the Redwood Road boulder pile.

Chimeshead-4

And what to say about this one? It’s an unusual lithology within the Leona. My impression just from eyeballing it was that it’s an autobreccia — a ground-up body of lava or tuff consisting of lumps of the original rock in a matrix of pulverized (and relithified) rock. But that’s not the only possibility.

Another outcrop up on the valley wall exposes a slickenside that covers a good square meter.

Chimeshead-5

At the base of the cascade is more engineered land, a small catchment housing a screened culvert entrance. Chimes Creek is trapped here and conveyed beneath the old quarry and across the freeway to emerge in the Millsmont neighborhood. As I say, it’s engineered land, but it’s planted with trees and rather pleasant. It also catches runaway rocks before they can take out a townhome down below.

Chimeshead-6

The view up from the lip of the catchment shows the two outcrops and the shape of the land.

Chimeshead-7

I can’t wait to return for a closer look, though with so many other places to see it might be a while.

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