Archive for August, 2013

Rock yard

23 August 2013

Years ago, a homeowner installed this yard facing Humboldt Avenue. I think of it as a California zen garden.

humboldtrockyard

These days, landscapers are obliged to buy rocks that come from out of town, produced in anonymous quarries by the big-rig load. This yard could have been furnished with stone from just a couple miles away. One of my many pipe-dreams is to set up a stoneyard where I’d salvage and sell recycled rock from local sources. The market would be vanishingly small, but if just a few people cared that might be enough.

Witter Field crossing

19 August 2013

Piedmont’s Witter Field occupies the valley of Bushy Dell Creek, in an opening in the topography where a large formal garden once sat. The creek is culverted here, but once in a while it needs attention, as it did last month. Out of sight is not out of trouble.

witterfield

It reminds me of the city streets: it seems like as soon as a nice new pavement is put down, a crew comes along to cut it open, as if the asphalt were there just to make a clean work surface.

The route 24 cut, south side

11 August 2013

A few weeks ago I managed to get a very nice view of the roadcut where the end of Gudde Ridge was trimmed to make room for route 24, east of the Caldecott Tunnel.

24southcut

That’s the lava flows of the Moraga Formation on the left. On the right edge is the coarse conglomerate of the underlying Orinda Formation. Click the photo for a 1000-pixel version. (The cut on the north side of 24 is shown here.)

This is not a view straight on; the ridge runs toward the lower right, so the steeply tilted rocks look vertical from this angle. It can often be hard to figure out the exact orientation of rocks, even in a splendid exposure like this.

Foothill’s foot

6 August 2013

Foothill Boulevard descends to Lake Merritt in this gentle slope down from the old marine terrace (Clinton terrace).

foothillfoot

For a mile and half east from here, Foothill runs along the terrace. East of 14th Avenue, where it’s a two-way street, it skirts the steep edge of the Fan at San Antonio hill where the contrast between the two geologic units is most dramatic.


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