Making land

middle harbor point

Oakland began with a marshy waterfront; sure it was full of fish and oysters, but you couldn’t do big-time commerce there to match the transcontinental railroad depot. So the marshes were filled and the shore extended into deeper water and passages dredged until Oakland had a splendid harbor, and it still does today. Thankfully, we’ve even had the drive and funding to recreate a small example of a working shoreline here at the new Middle Harbor Shoreline Park . . . we hope. If this kind of work is done with a geomorphologist’s guidance, there’s a chance that it could age gracefully instead of sinking or slumping or washing away. With that hope, I dub this piece of land Middle Harbor Point.

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4 Responses to “Making land”

  1. Levi Says:

    Hey all.I just wanted to say that I have been seeing some fresh geology at both the eastern and western portals of the Caldecott Tunnel. I am working as a filed paleontologist/geologist for the 4th bore for a month now and have been privileged enough to see first hand rocks from auger spoils 0-95 feet below ground surface! Interesting stuff!

  2. Andrew Says:

    Levi, the local geological society would love to have a chance to visit the work site. Write to me at geology at about dot com if this looks like a possibility.

  3. Farmlady Says:

    I just drove through the Caldecott tunnel 4 times the weekend before last and I thought about this. I wondered if anyone was looking at the dirt that was being taken out. Has anyone found anything interesting?
    I was just visiting the Bay Area but I live in the foothills of the Sierras and if I had a bore dug on my property I would probably hit the Mother Lode.
    Also, how safe is the old tunnel, geographically. I would hate to be in it during a major earthquake.

  4. Andrew Says:

    Don’t know how long this URL will last, but ANG newspapers covered that subject just the other day: http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_15548021

    They have paleontologists contracted to examine the excavation for as long as the fossils last, probably until the bore hits basalt.

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